11 Feb

Question Your Answers

Dear Friends,

Here’s another thought I’d like to share

It is often more important to question our answers than to answer our questions.

~Ganga White

Earlier this week, a client came in an hour late for his scheduled appointment.  He quickly blamed my secretary and accused her of having written 9am, not 8am, on his appointment card.  He was caustic and refused her offer to reschedule the appointment.  He was rude to her as he huffed out of the office (as if any of this was going to somehow change the reality of him not being able to be seen right then). About two hours later, he called the office and very sheepishly apologized saying that he had found his card and that she had, indeed, written 8am.  Now he wanted to reschedule. Because this person did not question his own “answer” or correctness, he created more angst in his own life and spread that angst around as well. Whereas this can be seen as a simple example of pride or arrogance, I’m sure that underneath that tough exterior was a sense of fear, embarrassment, sadness or disappointment.  However, as long as he stood firmly in his “answer,” he eliminated the possibility of learning from his questions. This is the same dynamic that operates in assumptions, stereotyping and habitual, patterned responses.  When we approach situations with answers already in place, we close down our ability to take in new information.  We ultimately become prisoners of our past, operating in a closed system. (The metaphor of breathing only re-circulated air on an overseas flight comes to mind.)  Old information is important, but not complete.  Messages from our past (be they from family, society or self) are meant to inform our present, not determine our future. How might we keep fresh information and new learning flowing in our lives?  What would it be like to consciously decide to honestly and compassionately question some of our old answers?  What if, for today, wherever you go, you ask yourself, “Am I open to learning here or am I operating on auto-pilot?”  Just ask.  Let the question be your door to new answers.

Wishing you questions and curiosity,

Namaste,

Augusta
signaturepic

 
    
 
 
    
 
 

Originally Published February 11, 2011

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
03 Feb

Tides of Change

Dear Friends,

Here’s another thought I’d like to share

When the tide of change rolls in we can resist or be at peace, struggle or release.

~Danna Faulds

Whether or not things change is not our choice – how we respond to that change is!  When we resist change, we resist life.  We build a dam with our resistance but fail to realize the energy we use holding that dam up does nothing to stop the water from pushing again   st that dam.  That used up energy costs us dearly.  When we use our energy to “wish” something was or wasn’t as it is (i.e. resist change), we no longer have the energy to make appropriate choices for our lives. We cease to “see” what is, because we’re so busy holding up our dams.  We get invested in our dams.  We deem them important and useful.  We imbue them with power.  Life (like the water behind the dam) pays us no mind.  Life doesn’t stop flowing – we just can’t enjoy the flow.  Life goes on and we are separated from it by dams of our own making.  Recognizing our resistance makes it possible to choose differently.  Compassionately understanding that our resistance was a protective gesture, not a stupid one, introduces the option of acceptance.  When we accept where we are (i.e. accept life as it is) we have the power to make new choices – powerful choices – choices that free up the energy we were spending for naught. Might it be a worthy endeavor to ask ourselves what dams we have built and whether or not they are worthy of our continued energy expenditure.

Wishing you all a peaceful flow.

Namaste,

Augusta
signaturepic

 
    
 
 
    
 
 

Originally Published February 3, 2011

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather