24 Mar

Peace

Dear Friends,

Here’s another thought I’d like to share

Turning inward to the source of peace, I take refuge in the easy sigh of breath released./p>

Danna Faulds<

When life is busy, time is pushed and we’re juggling faster than we thought we could, it’s easy to want to throw up our hands and scream, “Oh, just give me some peace!”  We want to demand that the world just stop for a second so we can breathe!  “Is that too much to ask? I mean, REALLY! Goodness! I’m peddling as fast as I can!”  We get swept away by our own sense of indignation that life is pushing us with unfair urgency.           Uh oh…  I think we forgot some stuff.  Breathe in…. Breathe out… Life isn’t pushing us; our thoughts about our lives are pushing us.  Peace isn’t something we demand from life, it’s something we open to and allow.  Peace isn’t conditional; it is, rather, our ability to experience that peace that seems so conditional.  Time isn’t going any faster; we just aren’t slowing down enough to enjoy the ride.  We’re not in over our heads; we just forgot how to float!           Oh yeah…oops. Breathe in… Breathe out…           Forgetting happens.  It’s okay.  There’s always an opportunity to remember again.  Smile at yourself and kindly chuckle at your fierce growl at life.  It is in that moment of remembering that you begin again.  You breathe in and then release the breath as you release your demands, your expectations and your exclamations.  Slowly, more skillfully now, you come back to center.  You turn inward to the source of peace.  You re-visit that peace that was there all along ~riding your breath back home.

Wishing you peace,

Namaste,

Augusta
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Originally Published Thursday, March 24, 2011

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17 Mar

Forgiveness

Dear Friends,

Here’s another thought I’d like to share

With forgiveness, your victim identity dissolves, and your true power emerges – the power of Presence.

Eckhart Tollelt

When I think about forgiveness, I think about holding someone hostage with my negative energy.  However, in truth, it is my negative energy that holds me hostage.  As long as I am unwilling to forgive, I am inextricably bound to the object of that unforgiveness.  In forgiving, I release myself from that bondage.  I am no longer tied to that person or situation, and the energy I was expending is freed up to be used more wisely.           As long as I am unwilling to forgive, I have to continuously, or at least sporadically, feed the fire of “victim.”  The fuel looks something like this… “I’ve been wronged.”  “That person or situation is unfair.”  “How dare them!”  “That no-good, sorry, low-down scoundrel!”  “How could they!?”  ~What part of these statements sound like <b>I want validation that I’ve been wronged</b>?  Basically, I am a victim!  Well, victims are, by definition, helpless.  And helpless means having no choice.  Forgiveness is the choice that serves as the key to the jail cell of victimhood.          Deborah Adele writes, <i>“A bird cannot hold its perch and fly. Neither can we grasp anything and be free.”</i>  Holding on to unforgiveness prevents us from having the freedom to fly.  You gotta let go!          Might you ask yourself, “What am I holding on to that keeps me from flying?”  “What victim identity do I cling to?”  If your heart was free and you could reclaim your power, would you?  Release you.  Let go.  Fly and be free.

Wishing you a loosened grip and strong wings.

Namaste,

Augusta
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Originally Published March 17, 2011

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12 Mar

The Mirror of Commitment

Dear Friends,

Here’s another thought I’d like to share

We have to commit to something for it to be a mirror in our lives.

~Rolf Gates

When we truly commit to something, we can then clearly see what we do in the face of that commitment.  For those of us with a punitive or condemning inner voice, facing that reflection can feel scary and/or painful.  No wonder we don’t like to commit to certain actions – losing weight, meditation, eating right, complete truthfulness, etc…  When we do, unless we are “perfect” (and who’s perfect) the mirror of our commitment reflects back to us what we didn’t do, didn’t do well enough, didn’t do often enough, did do and shouldn’t have, could’ve done and didn’t, and on and on.   We get uncomfortable with what we see and, before we even know it, we are condemning ourselves and beating ourselves up.  Now, what was at first just uncomfortable, has now become hurtful.  We get angry for our reactions and the spiral intensifies. Out of a need to protect ourselves from our own harshness, we throw away the mirror!   But there’s another option…  We can commit to something and then use what we see reflected back to us as information from which to learn about ourselves. If we can be truly curious about our actions, or lack thereof, we can learn about our patterns, our hindrances and our motivations.  If we can be compassionate with ourselves, we will remain open to learning, thus we will grow and change.    Might we “learn to learn” rather than continue to condemn?  If we allow ourselves to commit to something and commit to truthfully and compassionately seeing ourselves reflected back in our responses to that commitment, might we soften enough to see old patterns and make new choices?  Just perhaps. What would you commit to for the next week?  Something small, like 3 mindful breaths each morning.  What would it require of you?  Why (and I ask you to ask yourself this question with the utmost compassion) might you not want to commit? Could you commit without the fear of your own tyranny? There are so many things to be learned if we free ourselves from the threat of the sledge hammer of condemnation.

A dear friend of mine told me of an old joke…Why do we keep hitting ourselves over the head with a hammer?  Answer…Because it feels so good when we stop.  
Might we stop?

Wishing you a clear mirror and a compassionate heart.

Namaste,

Augusta
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Originally Published March 12, 2011

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